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Free Skin Cancer Screening at the Praxair Cancer Center at Danbury Hospital on May 19th and May 20th

Friday, April 30, 2010 - Danbury, CT

More than 1 million skin cancers are diagnosed each year in the United States, according to the American Cancer Society. Frequent, unprotected sun exposure is the most preventable risk factor for most skin cancers, including melanoma. The good news is that there are many ways to protect yourself and your family from skin cancer, or catch it early enough so that it can be treated effectively.

On May 19th and May 20th Danbury area dermatologists affiliated with Danbury Hospital encourage residents to get screened at the annual skin cancer screening. The screenings are part of Danbury Hospital’s public awareness /community benefit campaign during Skin Cancer Awareness Month.

Skin Cancer Risk Factors

Danbury Hospital’s annual skin cancer screenings bring together Danbury Hospital dermatologists and other affiliated clinical health professionals that can allay fears regarding spots on the skin, especially for those considered to be at high risk, including people with light (fair) skin, especially blond or red hair, blue/green/gray eyes, a family/personal history of skin cancer, high sun exposure, multiple sunburns, use of a tanning bed or sun lamps and high number of moles. Darker-skinned people, including African Americans and Hispanic Americans, can also be affected.

Skin Cancer Prevention and Early Detection

Let’s face it. It’s not possible or practical to avoid sunlight completely. Many of us think about sun protection only when we’re planning to spend a day at the beach or by the pool. Before you plan to spend an extended length of time in the sun remember the catch phrase “Slip! Slop! Slap! … and Wrap” to help you remember the four key ways to protect yourself and your family from the sun’s powerful rays:

  • Slip on a shirt
  • Slop on sunscreen
  • Slap on a hat
  • Wrap on sunglasses to protect the eyes and sensitive skin around them

The annual skin cancer screenings hosted by Danbury Hospital runs from 6 to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, May 19th and Thursday, May 20th at the Praxair Cancer Center lobby located on the first floor of the Stroock Building. Screening participants are asked to park in the Red Parking Garage, Locust Avenue entrance. Screening registration is on a first-come, first-served basis and closes each evening at 7:45 p.m.

Come to the screening if you’ve never had your skin checked for skin cancer, you don’t have insurance or your policy doesn’t cover a visit to a dermatologist and/or if you want to learn more about preventing or recognizing skin cancer.

For more information, contact Danbury Hospital at 1-800-516-3658, or visit DanburyHospital.org.

About Danbury Hospital

Danbury Hospital is a 371-bed regional medical center and university teaching hospital associated with the University of Vermont College of Medicine, the Yale University School of Medicine, the Connecticut School of Medicine and Columbia University Medical Center. The hospital provides centers of excellence in cardiovascular services, cancer, weight loss surgery, orthopedics, digestive disorders, radiology and diagnostic imaging. It also offers specialized programs for sleep disorders and asthma management. Medical staff members are board-certified in their specialties, and most serve on the faculty of the nation’s finest medical centers offering a higher level of experience.

The Praxair Cancer Center at Danbury Hospital is dedicated to caring for people who are diagnosed with cancer, personalizing their treatment plans based on the recommendations of multidisciplinary case review teams. Our cancer patients benefit from the latest diagnostic and treatment technologies and a full spectrum of outpatient and in-hospital oncologic services that includes dedicated emotional and practical support. A Cancer Care Coordinator works with patients from diagnosis onward to help navigate the sometimes confusing or overwhelming aspects of cancer treatment.




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